Oil and gas extracted from state land in West Texas has helped create unprecedented wealth for the University of Texas System. 
<p>Oil and gas extracted from state land in West Texas has helped create unprecedented wealth for the University of Texas System.&nbsp;</p>

Oil money is a gusher for UT System, but a trickle for students

The fracking boom helped push the Permanent University Fund close to $20 billion, and every year the UT System gets a slice of that money to spend. Hundreds of millions have been dedicated to big-ticket projects, while just a sliver goes to student financial aid.

 
 

Colonias on the border struggle with decades-old water issues

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Cristina Morales and her husband, Rafael Martinez, said they don&rsquo;t plan on moving from Horizon View Estates, a colonia in El Paso County. The colonia has no sewage treatment, and they said the tap water occasionally comes out brown.&nbsp;
<p>Cristina Morales and her husband, Rafael Martinez, said they don&rsquo;t plan on moving from Horizon View Estates, a colonia in El Paso County. The colonia has no sewage treatment, and they said the tap water occasionally comes out brown.&nbsp;</p>

All along the U.S.-Mexico border, about 840,000 mostly low-income, immigrant Latinos have settled in colonias – cheap plots of land outside city limits without basic infrastructure such as water and sewage systems, electricity and paved roads.

UT-Austin removes Confederate statues in the middle of the night

Late Sunday night, Aug. 20, 2017, UT-Austin announced it would take down three Confederate statues on campus.&nbsp;A statue of former Texas Gov. James Stephen Hogg (shown here) was also removed.&nbsp;
<p>Late Sunday night, Aug. 20, 2017, UT-Austin announced it would take down three Confederate statues on campus.&nbsp;<span>A statue of former Texas Gov. James Stephen Hogg (shown here) was also removed.&nbsp;</span></p>

In a surprise move, workers at the University of Texas at Austin removed multiple Confederate statues from a prominent grass mall on campus late Sunday night.

With Supreme Court appeal, Texas wants to keep congressional map intact

Jose Garza, an attorney for the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, and former Texas Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer speak to reporters on April 27, 2017, following a status conference on a years-long challenge to Texas' political maps.&nbsp;
<p>Jose Garza, an attorney for the Mexican American Legislative Caucus, and former Texas Rep. Trey Martinez Fischer speak to reporters on April 27, 2017, following a status conference on a years-long challenge to Texas' political maps.&nbsp;</p>

Attorney General Ken Paxton revealed that Texas has no plans to ask lawmakers to redraw the state's Congressional map in a fresh round of legislative overtime. Instead, Paxton is appealing the ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court.